Tag Archives: Dallas TX

What’s Doing at the Dallas Museum of Arts?

Cats & Cocktails at the DMA

TRAVEL HERE: ARTFUL DELIGHTS AT THE DMA

So I’ve been in the process of catching up on my adventures.  We’ve been to Gruene TX for a girl’s road trip, Birmingham AL for business and Fort Worth for Monet.  All this leaves me with yet another confession.  If you missed the Devine Felines at the DMA, mea culpa.  If you miss Mexico 1900-1950, then that’s going to be your fault.

A Busy Autumn Break

My autumn disappeared in a haze of responsibility.  Global Heart Ministries had a tea, a video shoot and a fundraiser.  I also went on that trip I haven’t been able to tell you about.  So they kept me pretty busy.  I sort of disappeared out of my life until the October 22 fundraiser happened.  After all that, I was just about ready for a life and I took on a project that I could do completely at home.  I needed a break.

That’s when the invitation to the opening of the Art and Nature exhibition came along.    Bill and I put the event on our calendar and zipped downtown to take a gander.  We spent a perfectly lovely evening at the museum.  The art focused on the Middle Ages and as such pretty much everything in the exhibit was related to the Catholic faith.  There were reliquaries, crosiers , crucifixes, stained glass, etc. etc. etc.  The workmanship was exquisite and we thoroughly loved the whole thing.

Perhaps our favorite thing was the Scavenger Hunt.  Yep – a scavenger hunt.  Now many museums and such offer scavenger hunts, but they are usually for kids and they’re offered in black and white on a piece of copy paper.  Nope, that wasn’t it at all.  Instead on beautiful slick paper in the richest colors possible, we were challenged to identify 14 various images, each of which were only a small part of a larger work.  Not only was it a lot of fun, but it inspired us to take a long, deep look at things we might have just glanced at and then walked away.

After the Scavenger Hunt we checked out the offerings at the refreshment table, but didn’t see much to our liking, so we headed home.  Here’s the good news.  It will be at the museum until the 19th of this month, so please hurry in to see it.

Shaken | Stirred | Styled

A Pleasant Sunday

But the exhibit about the Middle Ages wasn’t all that was happening at the DMA, so we made another visit.  Confession!  I know it had to happen after the opening of Art & Nature, but if I was forced to testify as to when, I would be in trouble.  We walked back through Art & Nature and then strolled down to Shaken| Stirred |Styled.  This is a small exhibition in a side gallery that would be easy to miss, so if you go between now and November 12th, please be sure to ask someone where it is.

The entire exhibit is a collection of bar ware from the 19th century and it’s cool – really cool.  There are punch bowls and martini glasses, but perhaps the most fun is cocktail shakers from the Prohibition Era.  

We also took a look at Divine Felines, which is now closed.  The collection of Egyptian cat mummies and other feline related items was interesting, but not compelling to us, so I don’t feel quite so bad about allowing you to miss it.

Since our goal was to kill the afternoon, we also strolled through the South American and American galleries, enjoying old favorites.  Since this is where Bill and I met, all the art seems like friends of the family.  Truly a wonderful way to spend an afternoon in Dallas.

Don’t Miss Mexico

One final note before I go.  A new exhibition just started at the museum, Mexico 1900-1950: Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, Jose Clemente Orozco and the Avant-Garde.  I am really sorry to report that once again Global Heart Ministries has interfered with my love of art.  Last week I had to miss the exhibition’s opening party to help with the video shoot we were filming.  I love GHM, but it’s tough when I have to make decisions like that.  The good thing is that the exhibit just opened and it will be here through July.  Even with my crazy schedule I should be able to make it.

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Lakeside Baptist Church – My Other Family

Mom and I with Eddie Jo, one of Mom's dear Lakeside friends.

Mom and I with Eddie Jo, one of Mom’s dear Lakeside friends.

TRAVEL BUG TALES: KIN BY THE BLOOD OF THE LAMB

As I’ve chatted about beaches, I’ve also mentioned Mrs. Lide.  Mom and Mrs. Lide were besties.  I get that, because I have a bestie.  But having a bestie doesn’t short circuit the ability to have other very, very good friends.  My mom taught me that and I am grateful.  I feel sorry for people who are so wrapped up in one another there’s no room for the rest of the world – whether the other is a spouse, a best friend or a relative.  When we moved to Texas, Mom lost her close daily contact with Mrs. Lide, but it didn’t cripple her.  She just set about filling her life with other wonderful people.  No one ever replaced Mrs. Lide in her heart, but the fun she shared made for a great life. 

From the Archives!  The Caves had attended for 20 of these years and my sister is still there these 30 years later!

From the Archives! The Caves had attended for 20 of these years and my sister is still there 30 years later!

The Lakeside Connection

When we moved to Dallas, one of the first things Mom did was take us church shopping, but it was a short trip.  We visited the Baptist Church closest to us, but it didn’t pass the Ruth test.  Nothing wrong with it, beyond the fact that it wasn’t what Mom was looking for.  The next Sunday we ventured a little further down Garland Road to Lakeside Baptist Church.  Mom hitched her wagon to Lakeside and she was set for the rest of her life.

Back in those days, the Baptist Sunday Schools were divided up by age and marital status and there was no getting around it. Nowadays they call them Life Groups and the age/marital status rule is not so hard and fast.   Mom landed in a group of ladies called the Grace Class.  They did life together for decades.  They prayed for one another when there were problems and sickness.  A death brought out casseroles and potted plants. If one of my parents were in the hospital for an operation, the entire waiting room filled up with Lakesiders.  I can’t begin to tell you how much I loved those people or how much they loved me.

As a side note, my dad was a Sunday School Rebel.  The wives and the husbands of my parents’ classes would meet together for a general assembly each week, to sing a few hymns, make announcements and pray together.  Then they’d divide up into several smaller, sexually-segregated groups to study the lesson in their quarterly.  Dad’s biblical curiosity dug deeper than the quarterly, so when a Bible scholar started a survey class, open to both men and women, Dad defected.  Mom didn’t approve.  She called the Bible Survey Class members kooks and weirdos. To hear her tell it, you’d think Jesus Christ Himself had ordained the Baptist Adult Quarterly.

A peek at Mom's Sunday School Class

A peek at Mom’s Sunday School Class

The 42 Group

By some sort of natural selection,  several of the Lakeside couples started a group which played 42 together once a month.  This started as a simple game of dominoes with a few snacks, but it didn’t stay that way.  It quickly morphed into elaborate table decorations and a three-course meal before the dominoes came out.

My Dad, the Sunday School Rebel, didn’t approve of the ordeal which this simple monthly game of dominoes turned into.  Probably none of the men did, but the women were in their glory.  To them, the annual assignment of homes for the get-togethers was more important than the Paris Peace Talks.  Popular assignments were February and October, because Valentines and Autumn Leaves were easy party themes.  Ending up with December was a fate worse than death.  Being the December hostess meant you had to decide which restaurant would win the honor of hosting the Christmas gala and you had to be sure your Christmas decor bested the previous year’s display.

There were unspoken, elaborate rules attached to the monthly game and as my parents aged the rules evolved.  Choosing a replacement couple for someone who was unable to attend in a given month was a monumental task, carefully discussed during multiple phone conversations.  The ladies also discussed how put upon they were by the necessity of finding another couple.  Hadn’t they been having this game on the second Friday night of the month for a long time?  How could the missing couple dare to put everyone through this ordeal?

Then there was the first couple to quit for medical reasons.  I heard much discussion about whether that had been a decision of necessity or convenience.  Another milestone was the first death.  Should widows be allowed to continue and who would serve as partners?  Every season of life brought its own challenges to the 42 Group and finally an end.

Most comical to me was the ride sharing.  As these dear ones aged, some of them weren’t getting around so well.  To complicate matters, while the group had started out in a close knit geographical area, over the years some of the couples moved.  The result was a flurry of monthly phone calls about who was going to ride with whom – and more than a few discussions about why anyone would move out of East Dallas.

Memories of these dear ones bring me both laughter and tears.  It seems impossible, but I couldn’t find a single shot of the 42 Group among Mom’s photos.  There were plenty of her friends from that monthly domino game and I have so many memories, but no photos.  So, you’ll have to use your imagination.

Come back next week and we’ll go to Padre Island with one of the 42 couples.

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Saint Rocco’s New York Italian at Trinity Groves

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Margaret Hill Hunt Bridge sits between Downtown Dallas and Trinity Groves

TRAVEL HERE: MY NEW GO-TO ITALIAN PLACE

On a Sunday afternoon, after a museum visit, Bill and I spent about forty-five minutes driving around downtown Dallas.  We thought maybe in one of those places we used to hang out we’d find something new and exciting, but mostly we found construction sites for more multi-use developments.  It was far too hot to enjoy anything al fresco, but we were out of options for new and exciting, so we made our way to Trinity Groves.

Giving It Another Try

Bill and I have tried to have fun at Trinity Groves several times and have always been under-impressed, even though we see huge potential for the area it’s just not hopping 24/7 like we think it should be.  Perhaps on Friday or Saturday evening it fulfills it potential, but that’s when we’re usually in Heath enjoying a glass of wine on our patio.  There’s something about a great view out your back door that discourages fighting for parking spaces and tables on weekend evenings.  Still, we like being plugged into our city, so we venture out on Sundays and various weekdays.

On this particular Sunday afternoon it appeared we’d bombed out again.  Granted 5:30 is a little early for dinner and very late for lunch, but the whole Trinity Groves complex was empty of anything except a few employees standing inside restaurants polishing glasses and wrapping silverware.  Drinking and dining just weren’t happening.

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Delicious dining at Saint Rocco’s New York Italian

Saint Rocco’s

However, we were hungry and tired of being hungry.  Since a place called Saint Rocco’s had just opened for the day we strolled inside.  The hostess was very glad to see us and placed us in a seat where we could see the whole restaurant.  It was something to see.

The decor is black and white with touches of red.  Black and white tile floor, black table and chairs with white tablecloths.  A large bar separates the restaurant from the food prep area.  Shelves of large cans of tomatoes and other staples add a hint of color.  We liked it!

And Then There Was Food

The menu has all the usual Italian food choices, but don’t get discouraged.  As soon as they delivered the warm delicious bread to our table, we knew we’d wandered into the right place.  Even the olive oil they gave us to dip the bread in was special.  Then we washed the bread down with a little Moretti’s and life was good.

While we waited for our meal the manager came around to chat us up.  She was a darling thing with a charming accent and we immediately liked her.  Bill asked her what the difference was in Italian and New York Italian.  It was something I’d never thought about before.  Had you?

Our gracious host explained that when Italians came to the States, they couldn’t get the ingredients they used to make their family dishes at home, so they had to find replacements.  Italian family recipes made with American ingredients are collectively New York Italian and they are beloved far beyond the Big Apple.

Bill and I both chose classics.  He had the Eggplant Parmesan and I had the Alfredo.  He was glad he had plenty for two meals, but I wolfed mine down in one fell swoop.  I loved it and here’s what I loved, the sauce, which was delicious, was used with restraint.  Most Alfredo dishes are drowned in too much sauce.  In this dish I could taste everything and had a delightful sauce to compliment it all.  The pasta was perfect, the vegetables were perfect and the sauce was perfect – and they were all presented in perfect proportions.

Confession, the dessert experience was disappointing.  Apparently, there is a shortage of dessert menus, because when we asked for one the waitress slipped it out of an apron pocket.  We landed on a choice, but it was one they no longer offered.  Before we had time to reconsider the other choices, the waitress had slipped the menu back into her pocket.  We took it as a sign we were not meant to have dessert and asked for the check at the first opportunity.

We’ll Be Back

Dessert mishap aside, we’ll be returning.  The atmosphere is nice, the prices are reasonable and the food is out of this world.  The service was good enough and we loved the manager.  Maybe next time we visit we may finally have an al fresco experience in Trinity Groves to rave about.

 

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A Hot Sunday Afternoon in Dallas

TRAVEL HERE: DRIVING AROUND AMONG OUR MEMORIES

So it was a hot Sunday afternoon in Downtown Dallas and we were hungry.  We’d spent several very enjoyable hours re-familiarizing ourselves with the American galleries at the Dallas Museum of Art, but it was about to close.  I mentioned Trinity Grove, but also pointed out it was far too hot to take advantage of the al fresco dining that seems to be a primary draw to the area.  So Bill decided to drive around downtown for a bit and visit old haunts.

Downtown Ain’t What It Used To Be

Back in the Twentieth Century, Bill and I both used to spend a lot of time downtown.  In the seventies I was in credit card banking with a small independent bank and Republic Bank processed our transactions and cards.  I made frequent visits to the building topped by a rocket and covered in star-studded metal panels.  After branch banking came to Texas, I moved on to the copier industry and found myself downtown even more often – almost daily in fact, as I popped in and out of offices training folks to use copiers, fax machines and phones.

The old Sheraton in the shadow of the Southland Life Building

The old Sheraton in the shadow of the Southland Life Building

Bill had his days downtown, too.  His first venue was the Hilton where he financed his schooling by waiting tables at The Beef Baron and helping out at banquets.  Then he started his computer company and like me, popped in and out of downtown buildings.  He was selling, delivering and installing computer equipment to feed the copiers and fax machines my company sold.

We both have fond memories of those days so as we pulled away from the DMA, Bill took a drive through downtown.  First, we drove by the Hilton.  The venerable old motel is being transformed into a multi-use development with stories and stories of apartments.

We were impressed by the rail system and the many parks which have been inserted into the landscape.  Both of these additions are great improvements to the downtown we remembered, but we weren’t crazy about all the one-way streets.  Thankfully there wasn’t too much traffic or we might have grid-locked the whole place.

We drove over to the Omni Hotel to see their new multi-restaurant venue, but we weren’t tempted to hassle with the parking or valet, so we ignored our growling stomachs and decided on some more sight-seeing.

Neither are The West End and The Brewery

Bill decided to visit the West End.  A few old standards like The Palm and Spaghetti Warehouse were clinging to the sidewalk, but it was a sad tourist trap.  We regretted the loss of those days when all the hot restaurants were clustered in the West End and complimented by a multi-story shopping and entertainment venue.

Robert LeeI fondly remembered another Sunday afternoon when we happened upon Robert Lee Kolb, one of my favorite local entertainers, playing on the outdoor stage.  As I stood on the edge of the crowd Robert Lee began singing the song he always used to play when I’d walk into Beethoven’s, his club in the Bachman Lake area.  The strains of the familiar tune startled me.  I looked away from my husband who I’d been chatting with to find Robert Lee staring right at me with a huge grin on his face.  It’s one of my favorite Dallas memories.

Disappointed to find the West End is about to become yet another multi-use development, we drove over to the Victory Park area and tried to figure out how to find our way into The Brewery, another hang-out we both loved before we knew each other.  For many years, The Brewery was famous for The Starck Club, a place where I have spent many an hour, but I was a regular to The Brewery before The Starck Club made it famous.  Newport’s was once one of my favorite seafood restaurants and it inhabited one end of the complex for decades.

Before The Starck Club appeared in The Brewery, I discovered Robert Lee Kolb down in an establishment called The Cellar, because it was a cellar.  From there I followed him to The Greenville Avenue Bar & Grill and further down Greenville Avenue to Dick’s Last Resort, before it moved to the West End.  Friends tell me he was playing at The Dixie House down in Lakewood back when I was in high school, but that was years before I hit Dallas’ clubbing scene.  My friendship with him began at Beethoven’s, where I’d show up with one or more members of my gang several times a week.

So that was the Sunday afternoon nostalgia tour.  Now Bill and I were hungrier than ever.  It was about 5:30, so the heat was unbearable, but we decided to go to Trinity Grove anyway.  come back next week and I’ll tell you about it!

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Final Words About the Museum of Biblical Arts

Detail of Title Page from a book in the MBA gift shop.

Detail of Title Page from a book in the MBA gift shop.

TRAVEL HERE: MORE GOOD STUFF AND MORE QUESTIONS AT MBA

OK, we’re back at the Museum of Biblical Arts in Dallas.  I’ve been warming up on the sculpture garden and one wing of the museum for several weeks.  I need to move on and need to tell you about the rest of it.

National Center for Jewish Art

I confess!  The murals on the walls of this gallery were some of my favorites items exhibited in this museum.  I’m a big fan of the Old Testament and Jewish Tradition.  The remarkable works on these walls were a contemporary look at these timeless things.  Even though I was trying to hurry through to keep up with my friends, I was forced to stop and ponder these images.  What were they representing?  Were the images Biblical or merely traditional?  Did I like them?  How did the titles relate to the work?

A Hallway Full of King James Bibles and a Library

One area that I definitely didn’t give enough time was the hallway full of historic King James Bibles.  At the end of the hallway was a library dedicated to Charles Ryrie, the man who wrote the Bible Commentary I most frequently refer to.  This exhibit and library are proof enough that the MBA deserves your attention.  The books on display are rare, ancient and beautiful.  I yearned for an opportunity to touch a page, even if it had to be with a glove-clad finger.

Contemporary Gallery

This was not one of my favorite galleries.  I’m not a big fan of Chagall.  I admire his creativity, but not the way he expressed it – if that makes any sense.  Half this gallery was devoted to pictures painted “in the style of Chagall”, but few were actually by Chagall.  That’s part of what kept nagging at me as I visited the museum.  Don’t give me replicas, prints, in style of or from the studio of.  In the days before the internet I can understand people being eager to see replicas or prints or anything that would give them an idea of these beautiful works of art they would never see, but nowadays you can gawk at a reasonable facsimile of almost any work of art you so desire, in your pajamas, without leaving your sofa.  If I’m going to get dressed and drive to a museum, I want to see the real thing or a new thing I wouldn’t look up online.

Also confusing in this gallery was a roped off section.  It looked like a storeroom where items were being crated or uncrated, but no one was working in there, so I couldn’t tell whether the art was coming or going.  Later an adjacent hallway was filled with similarly semi-packed objects’d art.  Inquiring minds want to know what was going on.

Odds and Ends

In halls behind the Contemporary Gallery and the Library, were two thought provoking pieces.  One was a photograph of a “Last Supper” but all the people in the picture were dressed as if they were characters in Japanese Noh theater.  Even when I don’t want to think about this painting, it keeps teasing the corners of my mind. The other item was a painting called the Tapestry of the Ages by Vladimir Gorsky.  I could have spent hours identifying the hundreds of people in this painting and considering their contribution to this world.

I stepped into the ballroom of the museum (They do weddings!) and was disappointed to discover it was covered with landscape paintings.  From a visit I made to the museum about the time it opened ( I actually think it was some kind of preview event) I had remembered the ballroom being home to something remarkable – and it may have been the resurrection mural, but it also seems there were pictures of the apostles.  (I was in the throws of care-giving drama. I didn’t get a blog written, so I can remember being impressed, just not by what!)  I want to be clear that the landscapes are wonderful.  Since they are landscapes of Israel, I can even understand their presence in a Biblical arts, it’s just that I miss whatever was there before!  I hate to think they removed the art to help sell the venue.

And while I’m complaining, if they are going to display an exhibition in the ballroom, then it needs to look like an exhibition space, not a catch all.  There were tables and chairs scattered around the room in no apparent order and the chairs were more randomly placed than the tables.  In one chair set a photo of the ballroom all tricked out for a reception.  My bet is someone left it behind after a meeting with a bride-to-be.  I’d already been chafed by the crating/uncrating debris spread out in the hall and gallery.  This added to my dysphoria.

The Main Attraction

The featured exhibit this summer is “God in the Garden, The Impressionistic Works of Henrietta Milan.”  I had somehow missed the signage for this part of the galleries.  I wandered in from the landscapes and found myself in galleries of Monet-like garden paintings.  They were gorgeous.  I wanted one of each, but I kept wondering what made them Biblical Art.

Come to find out, the paintings were by a Texas Impressionist and to quote the attendant at the ticket counter Milan is “very spiritual in her approach to painting.”  Okay…  I’m thrilled this Texas artist is getting exposure in a museum of this caliber, but I still have to wonder why.  In the catalog I purchased from the gift shop, Scott Peck, the Executive Director and Curator of the Museum, waxes eloquent, using the old hymn “In the Garden” as the springboard for his discussion of her art.  The brief article was interesting, even eloquent, but for me, it didn’t connect the dots.

I’ve rattled on far too long today, but there was no way I was going to have a fifth post in this series.  I am always honest with you in my reviews.  When I rave, you can trust that it was very good.  When I rant, you know something was very wrong with my experience.  I wanted very much to rave about the MBA and while there is a lot which is very rave-worthy, that’s not the whole story.  I don’t really want to rant against the museum, but there is also some dissonance resounding from my visit.  I hope you’ll go visit and tell me what you think.

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Exhibits in the Museum of Biblical Art

Catalog from a current exhibition at the Museum of Biblical Art

Catalog from a current exhibition at the Museum of Biblical Art

TRAVEL HERE: WHAT YOU’LL SEE AT THE MBA

I certainly didn’t anticipate a multi-post series on the Museum of Biblical Art  (MBA) when I sat down to write about my recent visit, but that’s what it’s turned into.  We’ve chatted about the origins and history of the place, discussed the sculpture garden, a little architecture and the people who visited the museum with me.  Finally, lets get down to the art!   

So What is a Biblical Art?

That’s a good question but I don’t know if I have an appropriate answer.  Inside the museum are examples of Judaica, modern mosaics, a bronze replica of the Pieta and an exhibition of some lovely gardenscapes, along with a collection of antique Bibles, a lot of statuary, many paintings and some prints loaned by Thomas Kinkaid.  Basically, if art has to do with the Bible, then it’s Biblical Art.

A Typical Thomas Kinkaid print - from a devotional book from the shelves of my personal library

A Typical Thomas Kinkaid print – from a devotional book from the shelves of my personal library

I did some reading up on the museum as I wrote these posts and what the museum really doesn’t want to do is push a particular religious persuasion and that’s OK, but in truth, I found the exhibits a little uneven.  Across the gallery from a huge and powerful original painting of the Resurrection by Ron Dicianni was a print by Thomas Kinkaid I usually see on thank you notes.  Gorgeous Judaic religious items in silver and gold were around the corner from a guy painting in the style of Chagall.  There were a few items by Chagall himself, but most were by this guy I didn’t know.   Many of the items in the museum were engaging, but others I merely found confusing.

A Souvenir Bookmark from the gift shop.

A Souvenir Bookmark from the gift shop.

Let’s Get Going

The first area we entered was the Colonnade and the map says it holds works by American artists.  However, the hallway was full of magnificent pieces of Judaica in silver and gold.  Book-sized containers of gold and silver held miniature religious objects of the Jewish faith.  They were gorgeous and interesting, but I didn’t see any symbols advising me of pieces described on the free audio tour, so even though I loved them I can’t tell you their significance.  They are also left off the museum’s website, so it’s a mystery.  Were the items created by American artists and if so, why are they disguised in ingenious containers that look like books?  I didn’t get to read all of the signs all the way through, so I moved on with a lot of questions.

The next room was the McCreless Collection of European Art.  I did listen to the audio tour’s description of the gallery.  The gentleman who owns the collection didn’t go into a museum until he was in his 40’s and when he did, he fell in love with religious art and started collecting.  His taste is eclectic, just like the museum his art is featured in.  I saw a Coptic Cross, the life-sized Pieta replica I mentioned and a number of paintings that said they were after the style of or painted by the studio of artists I was familiar with.  I’m still trying to figure out why anyone would want a huge bronze replica of Michelangelo’s Pieta.  I could see it in a local church, (maybe) but a museum?  It baffled me.

Detail of Queen Esther from Resurrection mural

Detail of Queen Esther from Resurrection mural

At the end of the Colonnade was a mixed bag.  My first glance in the room landed on one of the Thomas Kinkaid prints.  I happen to like Thomas Kinkaid in most situations, but being as familiar with him as I am, I almost didn’t bother going into the room and that would have been a mistake.  Also in the room is the huge Resurrection mural on canvas.  The chotskish souvenir bookmark does it no justice, because in real life the tomb is open and the painting is gorgeous.   The detail of Queen Esther is just a hint of its beauty.

The Jesus I grew up loving.

The Jesus I grew up loving.

The Resurrection mural distracted us for so long that I almost missed the familiar drawing of Jesus I had seen so many times as a child.  Intellectually I realized this stylized face of an American WASP is most likely not the face of the Resurrected Lord, but I have to confess that many times in my prayer, especially in my prayers addressing my deepest fears, this is the face I conjure when I cry out to Jesus.

I can’t believe it, but I’ve run out of words again and we’ve only scratched the surface.  I promise if you will come back next week I’ll tell you about the rest of the museum!

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A Visit to the Museum of Biblical Arts

TRAVEL HERE: MBA WORTH A VISIT

So last week I suggested you visit the Via Dolorosa Sculpture Garden at Dallas’ Museum of Biblical Arts.  It’s free and right across the street from NorthPark.  I also think you should go inside the museum.  Let me tell you about my recent visit.

An Outing with the Buffalo Gals

I live in a subdivision called Buffalo Creek and facilitate a Bible study for women in and around the neighborhood.  Mind you, I’m just the facilitator.  The irrepressible Beth Moore is the teacher, through her marvelous collection of video series.  We’re on our third and have plenty more to keep us busy.  We call ourselves the Buffalo Gals.

The group is small and while we’re officially a Bible Study, we’re also a group of friends.  We’ve developed the tradition of having some fun along the way.  We have lunch together on Bible Study day, find reasons to celebrate occasions together and each of Beth’s series is interrupted by what we call a field trip or play date.

Right now we’re doing a series on David and we decided to visit the Museum of Biblical Arts (MBA).  For good measure we planned for lunch to be across the street at Neiman Marcus’ NM Cafe.  So, the day definitely started out with the right vibes.

Where Do You Go In?

On a recent Wednesday morning the Buffalo Gals pulled up to the MBA a few moments after it opened and the parking lot was virtually empty.  Piling out of the car we stumbled into the Sculpture Garden and began orientating ourselves to the art.  Some of our members weren’t familiar with the Stations of the Cross, so we shared our experiences.

I was particularly fond of the MBA’s Via Dolorosa, because they didn’t leave Jesus in the Tomb the way the traditional Stations of the Cross do.  The garden includes a sculpture of the Risen Christ.  Hallelujah!  There were a few other pieces of sculpture by the same artist in the garden which were unrelated to the Via Dolorosa.  Most of them I liked, but his Rachel by the Well looked like an old woman, not the fresh-faced girl that inspired a man to labor fourteen years for the privilege of marrying her.

Then we had to decide how to enter the building.  It seemed logical to enter via the Damascus Gate replica next to the Sculpture Garden, but that was locked.  So we went to the double doors next to a porte-cochère on the front of the building.  I’m no architect, but the entrance seemed a little abrupt.  There is virtually no gathering space under the porte-cochère.  Nor is there much in the way of a vestibule inside the front of the building.  You open the door and are standing at the ticket counter.  If these guys ever booked a blockbuster exhibition they’d need to re-think the entry, but I digress.

The entry fee is $12, less for children, seniors, students and such.  Included with your entry ticket is an audio guide.  This makes the price very reasonable.  I have to admit I didn’t use my audio guide as much as I usually would, because I was trying not to slow down my friends.  The few bits I did listen to were very interesting, but it would take hours to listen to all the recordings as you wandered around.  I just promised myself I would hear them next time.

Well, look at this, I’ve used up all my words for today and I haven’t even gotten past the ticket counter.  Well, come back next week.  There’s a lot to see.

 

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Filed under Architecture, ART, Attractions, DESTINATIONS, DFW Metroplex, Gardens, Museums, Road Trips, TRAVEL