ART, Attractions, DESTINATIONS, DFW Metroplex, Fashion, Museums, TRAVEL

The DMA’s Divine Date with Dior

Dior at Dallas
Flights of Near Fantasy

TRAVEL HERE: A CELEBRATION OF FASHION AS ART

On Saturday the 18th, Dior: From Dallas to the World had not even opened to the public yet and I was back for my second helping.  It’s just that delicious.  You don’t even have to like fashion or art to appreciate this exhibition.  What do you like? Architecture, marketing, celebrity sightings, engineering, manufacturing?  Think I’m kidding?  Come take a look!

Thrilled Clear Down to My Socks 

Modern art is all fine and good for those of you who like it, but I was just about fed up with the overabundance of it at my museum.  Modern, pop, contemporary, avant garde and everything in between had become a steady diet at the DMA.  That’s OK, with the dawning of 2019, I take it all back.  I love the DMA again!

With this latest exhibition, I’ll be running down there every time I can dream up a reason to go – so Dallas friends, please call me and let’s make a date!  If you go with me, I can get you in for free.  Last week I told you about the great party the DMA threw to celebrate the opening of the exhibition.  Today let’s talk about the “over 100 haute couture dresses, as well as accessories , photographs, original sketches, runway videos, and other archival material,” promised in my invitation to the Opening Celebration.

Dior at the DMA
Awestruck Already!

All That and More

On my second visit, the weather promised rain, but that wasn’t scaring away the excited crowd which waited outside the DMA.  We arrived a few moments before opening and I was surprised to see so many people.  I hadn’t thought of ordering my free tickets to see Dior on that particular day, because it was still members only, but I should have.  At 11, the earliest we could get in was noon.

After a detour through the Berthe Morisot exhibition to kill an hour (unfortunately that exhibition ended on the 26th, for those of you who missed it) we took our tickets to the line for Dior.  The first peek at the dresses took my breath away, both times I saw it – and I have a sneaky suspicion it will continue to delight.  You thread your way into a relatively small hallway and on both sides of you, double-decked at eye level and above, are mannequins in gorgeous black Dior dresses against a red-lighted stage.

While no one explained the intent of the exhibition’s design, to me, the exhibition space seems reminiscent of the temporary nature of a tent set up for a fashion show – especially the behind the scenes part, where the designers and models would be scurrying about.  Scaffolding can be seen through the white plastic walls and seemingly hand drawn arrows point the way to go.

Once you’ve navigated the arrows in the hallways, you’ll find an area devoted to the nuts and bolts of the design business.  Twenty toiles, muslin mock-ups of drawings created by the designers, fill a wall.  Most of them I would be happy to wear, as is, but a few do reveal the temporary nature of the garment.   On the parallel wall, videos show the actual process of packaging perfumes, building hand bags and other wonders of manufacturing these dreams for sale.  Display cases show swatches of hand-beaded cloth, sketches with fabrics attached and other bits associated with the process of designing haute couture.

Dior at the DMA
Designs by Christian Dior Himself

Though other galleries have more eye-popping displays, the gallery to the left of the toiles has my favorite dresses.  The houndstooth number with the big bow would be the one I would want to take home with me.  It’s called Adventure and was from the 1948 Envol line, but the look is timeless.  In the same area are dresses designed by directors Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan and Gianfranco Ferre.

To the right of the toiles is a gallery devoted to later directors, John Galliano, Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri.  I can easily say their designs are stunning, but they depart from the gorgeous craft of Dior himself and wander into that fashion world where models wear dresses I can’t imagine seeing walk down the street.

You must follow a few more arrows to see the grandest gallery in the exhibition, called From Paris to the World.  It shows dresses, on two tiers on both sides of the room, which have been influenced by various places around the world.  Saris, kimonos and other costume-like gowns will awe and amaze you.  Some I loved.  Others just made me giggle.  The photo at the beginning of this post, of the dresses in arched compartments, is where those who love celebrity watching will gather.  These dresses were worn by Lady Gaga, Josephine Baker and Marilyn Monroe, to name a few.

You’re not through with the exhibition yet, but I have run out of words for today.  There are still treats to enjoy.  Come back next week and I’ll take you on a quick stroll through the rest of the exhibit.  Then the following week, I’ll go back to the beginning and share more details of the exhibit.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.